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Tuesdays With Jeff: Insights Into Your Health: A Common Sense Approach To Sound Nutrition

643868 10152212859810125 1966553194 n Tuesdays With Jeff: Insights Into Your Health: A Common Sense Approach To Sound Nutrition

This week Jeff continues his series all about getting healthy this summer! Each week he will have advice, tips and insights into helping you get to your ideal weight! As always, leave a comment to win one of Jeff’s great DVD’s! This week tell us if you have applied the principles of calorie density in your life, if so what were the results?

A Common Sense Approach To Sound Nutrition ©Jeff Novick, MS, RD

Calorie density, is the simplest easiest approach to healthy eating. It is easy to understand and follow and I have outlined the principles here. It is the most common sense approach to sound nutrition.  In addition, by  following the principles of calorie density, you will also meet all our other needs including vitamins, minerals, fiber, protein, essential fats, etc.  The basic principles of calorie density are simple and outlined below.

However, for those of you who still want to think about food groups, servings sizes and amounts of servings, I have provided an “old school” approach to this way of eating from that perspective.  In the end, the food you eat, and the amounts, will be the same.  The calorie density approach just provides the simplest easiest road to get there.

Remember, these are just guidelines expressing the principles and not exact recommendations.

1) The Calorie Density Approach

Principles of Calorie Density

- Hunger & Satiety

Whenever hungry, eat until you are comfortably full.  Don’t starve and don’t stuff yourself.

- Sequence your meals

Start all meals with a salad, soup &/or fruit

- Don’t Drink Your Calories

Avoid liquid calories.  Eat/chew your calories, don’t drink or liquify them. Liquids have little if any satiety so they do not fill you up for the calories they contain.

- Dilution is the Solution

Dilute the Calorie Density of your meals by filling 1/2 your plate (by volume) with intact whole grains, starchy vegetables and/or legumes and the other half with vegetables and/or fruit.

- Vegetables vs Fat/Oil

Vegetables are the lowest in calorie density while Fat/Oil is the highest.  Adding vegetables to any dish will always lower the overall calorie density.  Adding fat and oil will always raise the overall calorie density.

- High Calorie Dense Foods

Limit (or avoid) foods that are higher in calorie density (dried fruit, high fat plant foods, processed whole grains, etc) and when consumed incorporate them in meals made up of low calorie dense foods and think of them as a condiment.  (ie, add slices of avocado to a large salad, walnuts or raisins in a bowl of oatmeal and fruit).

 The Calorie Density Scale

2) The Six “Old School” Food Group Approach

Fruits (Apples, berries, oranges, etc)

- Calorie density is ~250 cal/lb

- A typical serving is 1/2 cup fresh/frozen

- 60 calories per serving

- 4-6 servings per day

Vegetables (broccoli, kale, cucumbers, etc)

- Calorie density is ~100 cal/lb

- A typical serving is 1/2 cup cooked, 1 cup raw

- 25 calories per serving

- 10-16 servings per day (this includes 2-4 servings of cruciferous vegetables)

Starchy Vegetables (Sweet potatoes, yams, winter squash, etc)

- Calorie density is ~500 cal/lb

- A typical serving is 1/2 cup cooked

- 80 calories per serving

- 5-7 servings per day

Intact Whole Grains (Brown rice, oats, millet, quinoa, etc)

- Calorie density is ~500 cal/lb

- A typical serving is 1/2 cup cooked or 1 oz dry

- 80 calories per serving

- 5-7 Serving per day

Legumes (beans, dry peas lentils)

- Calorie density is ~600 cal/lb

- A typical serving is 1/2 cup cooked

- 110 calories per serving

- 1-3 serving per day

High Fat Plant Foods (nuts, seeds, avocado’s, peanut)

- Calorie density is ~2800 cal/lb

- A typical serving is 1 oz nuts, seeds, peanuts; 1/2 avocado)

- 175 calories per serving

- 1-2 servings per day

A 2000 Calories “Old School” Sample Meal Plan (for reference only)

Breakfast:

Intact Whole Grains (2 cups) 320 calories

Fresh Fruit (1 cup) 120 calories

Nuts (1 oz) 175 calories

Lunch:

Starchy Vegetable (1 cup) 160 calories

Intact Whole Grains (1 cup) 160 calories

Legumes (1/2 cup) 110 calories

Veggies (3 cups of salad, soup and/or steamed veggies) 150 calories

Fruit (1/2 cup) 60 calories

Dinner:

Starchy Vegetable (2 cups) 320 calories

Legumes (1/2 cup) 110 calories

Veggies (3 cups of salad, soup and/or steamed veggies) 150 calories

Fruit (1/2 cup) 60 calories

Nuts/Seeds (1oz) 175 calories

This equals:

- 6 servings of Starchy Veggies/Whole Grains and 480 calories

- 6 servings of Intact Whole Grains and 480 calories

- 2 servings of Legumes and 220 calories

- 12 servings of veggies and 300 calories

- 4 servings of fruit and 240 calories

- 2 servings of nuts/seeds and 350 calories

Total 2070 Calories.

For those of you avoiding nuts/seeds, you can just leave them out and increase the number of servings or fruits, veggies, starchy veggies and/or legumes to equal 350 calories.

Summary

Calorie density really is the simplest easiest approach to healthy eating. It is easy to understand and follow and provides the simplest easiest path to good health. It is the most common sense approach to sound nutrition.  By following the principles of calorie density, you will also meet all our other needs including vitamins, minerals, fiber, protein, essential fats, etc

Have another great week, and remember…

Your Health Is Your Greatest Wealth!

Jeff Novick, MS, RD

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